607-772-0660

Haudenosaunee: People of the Longhouse

Opening April 30

Roberson is proud to unveil the newly updated Haudenosaunee exhibition, which displays the history and culture of The People of the Longhouse–on whose land the Roberson Museum and Science Center resides.

Through this exhibition, Roberson hopes to bring visibility to the Haundenosaunee Confederacy, and its history with this land prior to colonialism up to their continued stewardship today.

What does “Haudenosaunee” mean?

Many of us have grown up hearing the name “Iroquois” used to describe the Native tribe that resides in central New York. However, that name comes to us from another group of people.

The Haudenosaunee represent a unified group of peoples under a banner of peace. The word “Haudenosaunee” means “people of the longhouse.” So, how was this nation founded? The video above by PBS, tells the lore behind its unification.

The Haudenosaunee Confederacy is made up of six unique nations. Roberson recognizes it sits on the ancestral homeland of the Onondaga Nation. We extend our respect and gratitude to them as the past, present, and future stewards of this land. Roberson is committed to featuring the contributions this nation and its people have made and continue to make to art, history, and science.

Learn more about Native Land.

 

Support for this exhibition provided by

This exhibition has been generously funded by:

  • Roger Kresge Foundation
  • The Harriet Ford Dickenson Fund of the Community Foundation for South Central New York
  • The Community Foundation for South Central New York, Jill Morgan Packard Donor Advised Fund
  • Jill Morgan Packard Donor Advised Fund
  • Support for this exhibition is also provided by the United Cultural Fund, a program of the Broome County Arts Council the Conrad and Virginia Klee Foundation; the Zoos, Botanical Gardens, and Aquariums Program, administered by the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation; and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Exhibition Consultants:

  • Tony Gonyea, Faithkeeper, Onondaga Nation
  • Nina Versaggi, Senior Research Associate, Public Archaeology Facility, Binghamton University
  • The Broome County Historical Society

Roberson Staff:

Michael Grasso, Executive Director

Peter Klosky, Director of Exhibitions

Shannon Lindridge, Director of Collections

Christina Mack, Director of Education

Natalie Shoemaker, Marketing

Roberta Wackett, Designer

Maryanne White, Roberson Clayworks Director  Kelly Cole, Program Director

Jessie Stone He, Grant Writer

Mike Sisto, Research

 

Roberson thanks for their time, talents, or materials:

  • Staci Becker
  • Katherine and Nat Bouman
  • Frank Plunkett
  • Tri-K Farms, Owego, NY
  • Maria Wackett and Chris Welsh
  • Clayworks students:
  • Patricia Kephart-Downs
  • Jane Watkins
  • Heather Delorme
  • Jeong Eun Shim
  • Diane Pratt
  • Sharon Wiater 

Video Acknowledgements:

Peter Jemison, Ganondagan State Historic Site, Victor, NY Ron (Deganadus) McLester, Algonquin College, Ottawa, ON, Canada The Mohawk Nation at Akwesasne

Gaehnew Printup

Stylin Strings

 

 

 

Support provided by the general operations support grants from the United Cultural Fund, a program of the Broome County Arts Council; the Conrad and Virginia Klee Foundation; the Zoos, Botanical Gardens and Aquariums Program, administered by the New York State Office of Parks, Recreational, and Historical Preservation; and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.